Articles Posted in Brain Injury

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Approximately one million people in the United States are treated for a traumatic brain injury  (TBI) each year, and an estimated 5.3 million people live with a TBI-related disability. Motor vehicle accidents are a leading cause of TBI, particularly when cars strike pedestrians. Unlike broken bones or cuts, traumatic brain injuries may be permanent.

What Is a Traumatic Brain Injury?

A traumatic brain injury is most often caused by a blow or jolt to the head. An object that penetrates the brain tissue can also cause a TBI.

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According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal functions of the brain. A TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, but anyone who suspects they may be experiencing any degree of traumatic brain injury should seek immediate medical attention. TBIs may worsen if untreated and have a broad spectrum of symptoms with long-term and potentially deadly effects.

What Are the Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury?

TBIs can result from many types of accidents or wrongful acts, including:

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A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an often misunderstood and underestimated injury. When many people hit their heads, they often just rub the spots where they hit them and move on with their lives. Kids constantly hit their heads, and parents may brush them off with kisses. However, any type of blow to the head has the potential to cause a TBI.

A TBI occurs when a violent impact or jolt damages brain tissue by knocking it against the inside of the skull. Brain injuries can range from mild—often referred to as concussions—to severe. Extended loss of consciousness is one sign of a more severe brain injury, which may even leave permanent effects.

Make sure a doctor diagnoses even a mild TBI to ensure that you receive necessary treatments and protect yourself from further injuries. Diagnosis is also important because brain injury symptoms are difficult to identify and can frustrate a victim by interfering with normal functioning. You may feel out of it, suffer memory issues, feel irritable, or have difficulty processing information—even with a simple concussion. Once a doctor diagnoses you, you can better recognize the symptoms and adjust your life accordingly.

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Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can be extremely serious, but they can also go unrecognized and untreated. As such, TBIs are often referred to as the “silent epidemic” or even as “invisible injuries.” This silent or hidden quality can intensify the psychologically damaging effects of traumatic brain injuries.

Many events can lead to a TBI, and the recovery process is typically ongoing. TBIs are unpredictable and they can lead to overwhelming physical, emotional, and financial consequences for sufferers and their loved ones.

The Brain’s Vulnerability

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Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), which include concussions, are serious conditions that require immediate treatment for the various symptoms that may result. While many victims of concussions or other types of TBIs recover over time, they may not realize the increased risks that exist if they happen to sustain subsequent brain injuries in their lifetime.

It has long been recognized that sustaining a second head injury before the first one has healed can be dangerous and even life-threatening. However, the medical community is only beginning to understand the risks of sustaining multiple concussions over time—even after the patient has completely recovered from the previous concussion. Examining the conditions of former athletes who played contact sports for years has shed light on the subject. The following are some of the potential long-term effects of multiple brain injuries:

  • Early-onset dementia
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A traumatic brain injury is diagnosed after damage occurs to brain tissue after the brain hits the inside of the skull, usually due to head trauma. Even relatively minor brain injuries can be serious and should always be treated as such, including seeking immediate medical attention. Over time, a brain-injury victim may incur substantial costs and losses as a direct result of the injury. The following are some examples of how high the cost of a traumatic brain injury can be:

Medical expenses – It’s no secret that any type of medical care can be costly in the United States, with or without help from insurance. While all brain-injury victims should seek medical treatment, some will require more extensive treatment than others. Some examples of medical expenses that may be faced include:

  • Emergency department or urgent care visits
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According to the CDC, about 1.7 million people receive treatment for some degree of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on an annual basis in the U.S. Thousands of these victims are diagnosed with a “severe” brain injury, which is the most serious category of TBI. Severe brain injuries are unique in that the effects and complications can last for years. They even may be permanent. The following are only some of the long-term complications that can accompany severe brain injuries.

Coma – One sign of a severe brain injury is the loss of consciousness for an extended period of time. Victims can be comatose for days or weeks and may require time in the intensive care unit (ICU). In some tragic cases, a victim of a severe TBI may never fully regain consciousness.

Surgery – Another common yet dangerous complication of a severe TBI is increased intracranial pressure due to swelling of the brain or fluid buildup inside the skull. In some situations, doctors may need to operate to remove part of the skull to relieve pressure. In addition, they may insert a pressure monitor in the brain to identify when additional complications may be occurring.

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Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are very serious and often misunderstood. Because the symptoms and effects can vary widely, many people have difficulty explaining the full extent of the challenges and impairments that a TBI can cause. Our personal injury attorneys understand that this injury can change your life, and the following is some brief information regarding the nature of brain injuries.

Types

Brain injuries can occur in many ways and can damage many different areas of the brain tissue. A slight bump on the head can cause a brain injury, and TBIs are generally categorized in the following manner: