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​When to Hire a Truck Accident Attorney

Never hesitate to contact a truck accident lawyer after a truck crash. Every important consideration possible strongly points to needing legal help. Given the damages you suffered and the insurance coverage limits, you may be dealing with a high-dollar value claim. Not only do you need a lawyer, but you need one now. It costs you nothing to hire an attorney, but it costs you everything not to hire one. The longer you wait, the more you can damage the possible success of your attempt for financial compensation.

If you suffered an injury after a truck accident, hire an attorney to represent you now. An injury is usually physical, but it can also be property damage. Any expense or loss to you that results from someone else’s negligent actions can be legally considered an injury.

You Need an Experienced Lawyer to Take on the Insurance Company

You are not going up against the driver in a truck accident case. Most often, a trucking company employs the driver—and it bears responsibility for what its driver does. Even if you suffered injuries due to an owner-operator, there is still an insurance company involved in the case. Insurance companies and trucking companies have lawyers and systems in place to try to thwart your claims and pay you less than you deserve. If you have a compensation claim, hire a truck accident attorney.

The insurance company does not get to dictate what happens in response to your claim. They cannot take away or compromise on your legal right to compensation. This is what they will do if you let them. The guardrail that protects your ability to full and fair compensation is an experienced lawyer. The sooner you get that guardrail up, the harder it is for the insurance company to push your case over the edge.

There are numerous reasons you will need to hire a truck accident attorney immediately after an accident. Some are specific to truck accidents, and others result from the usual considerations after any personal injury claim.

A Truck Accident Lawyer Can Quickly Identify the Responsible Party

Truck accidents require an extensive investigation right after the accident before the evidence is lost. In any truck accident case, there are many possible defendants, including:

  • The truck driver responsible for the accident and the company that employed them
  • A maintenance company that was responsible for keeping the truck in proper working order
  • The manufacturer that made the truck in a product liability lawsuit
  • A third driver who cut in front of the truck and caused the accident
  • The government agency responsible for maintaining the road where the accident occurred.

Before filing a claim or lawsuit, you need to know who to file it against. You will not want to blame the driver if defective brakes caused the accident. At the same time, there may be more than one responsible party, and you can file cases against all of them. Multiple policies mean more insurance coverage to pay for your serious injuries.

You Can Lose Truck Accident Evidence if You Do Not Move Quickly

To perform a proper investigation, you need to have the full scope of the available evidence. Your attorney will need to comb through records and consult with experts to pinpoint the cause of the accident. Even though you must do this quickly, the investigation may still take time to accomplish. The sooner an attorney begins, the more thorough and precise the investigation they can perform. If you wait too long, you might lose some of your legal options.

Another major reason to hire an attorney quickly is that you can lose valuable evidence that can help prove your truck accident case. More so than any other motor vehicle accident, truck crashes have an extensive body of evidence that your lawyer can rely upon when trying to show liability.

These sources of evidence can include:

  • Black box data that provides key information about how the truck was being operated right before the crash
  • Maintenance records that show what measures the company took to keep the truck safe
  • Trucking company records that show how the company followed federal trucking regulations
  • Driver records regarding their safety history and drug testing

These sources of evidence can help prove your claims and give you more potential ways to argue that the trucking company or driver did something wrong. However, it takes an attorney to access them because they know the process.

Other Evidence that Your Lawyer Needs Obtain Quickly

In addition, you will need the standard evidence that will help in any motor vehicle crash, including:

  • Witness statements from people who saw the crash
  • Photo of the scene of the accident
  • The wreckage from the crash
  • Traffic camera footage that may show what happened

The Trucking Company can Lose or Destroy Evidence Unless a Lawyer Acts

When the trucking company has control over the evidence, you can never trust that you can obtain it at a later date. Even though federal regulations require trucking companies to keep records, sometimes trucking companies do not follow them. Their fears about having to pay a large settlement or judgment sometimes take priority over following the law.

An attorney knows how to deal with situations like this. Even if you do not get your hands on the evidence that can help you immediately, a lawyer will take steps to direct the trucking company to preserve evidence in anticipation of litigation. If the trucking company does not listen, and your lawyer discovers the company destroyed relevant evidence, they can be in serious trouble. You may even get punitive damages against them if your case goes to trial.

In the meantime, an attorney will assemble the evidence necessary to demonstrate liability. The longer you wait after an accident, the more likely this evidence will disappear. Witnesses can be harder to track down, and those you have may lose some of their recollections. The time window to collect the necessary evidence can even end weeks after the accident. Waiting too long to hire a lawyer, or even waiting at all, can cost you the chance to prove that the truck driver was responsible for your accident.

You Can Lose Money Without a Lawyer’s Help

In addition, you should have an attorney immediately to help you handle the legal process. When an insurance company is in the picture, you may not have control over when the legal process begins, even though you should. They may begin calling you, trying to pressure and manipulate you when you have injuries.

It does not matter to them that you are dealing with physical injuries and anxiety. Their only worry is settling a claim on favorable terms for them. In the meantime, you can make a critical mistake on your own without an attorney to protect your legal rights.

You may get calls or settlement offers not in your best interest. However, you will not know this without a lawyer to tell you how much your claim is worth. Some people may consider an offer of thousands of dollars right after an accident. When your case is worth millions, this offer is a trick to take money out of your pocket.

In a truck accident case, knowledge is power. A lawyer will provide the information you need to protect your legal rights. It will give you the confidence to wage a battle against a large insurance company and its insured trucking company.

Hiring a Lawyer Immediately Helps Cut Down on Possible Mistakes

Without an attorney, there is a far greater chance that you can make a mistake that will cost you money. It is safe to say that most people do not know much about the legal process, even under the best of circumstances. After the accident, this is even more true.

Hiring an attorney will also help give you and your family the peace of mind you need after an accident, knowing that there is someone tough in your corner. Peace is hard to come by after a serious accident, and your stress level is high. Knowing the challenge in front of you can make it difficult to begin seeking financial compensation.

This is the first step when you hire an attorney, and they will handle the details. Without making that call, you will continue to feel anxiety about your financial situation and future.

An Attorney Will Help You Begin Documenting Your Damages Right Away

Further, hiring an attorney immediately will help you know what you need to do to document your damages. A jury will only order compensation – and an insurance company will only pay for it – when the damages are entirely clear. Start documenting damages to the best of your ability right after the start of the accident. If you cannot do it yourself, your family can do it for you.

Your lawyer will instruct you on exactly what you must do to have a record of your injuries.

These steps will include:

  • Seeing all necessary doctors immediately
  • Keeping track of all medical bills
  • Journaling your daily experience in written form
  • Saving all pay data from your work
  • Documenting what you are missing out on in life that you enjoyed before the accident

All of these can show the full extent of your injuries and damages.

The Statute of Limitations Begins to Run Right After Your Accident

Finally, you should call a lawyer because time is of the essence in any legal claim. First, the legal process will take time. You must take many steps between the time you file your case or claim and when you receive compensation. You may not be in a position to file your claim right away, and it is certainly not something that you should rush. You must put your best foot forward in any claim or lawsuit, and it is not something that happens overnight.

Second, you have the statute of limitations to worry about. You have a certain amount of time to file a lawsuit. Once that period expires, you lose the ability to seek financial compensation for your injuries. While we are not suggesting that not calling a lawyer immediately will put you in danger of missing the statute of limitations, it is something that you need to keep in the back of your mind. Your lawyer needs time to work, including some space to negotiate with the insurance company before filing a potential lawsuit.

It Does Not Cost You Anything to Call an Attorney

It will cost you nothing to speak with an attorney. If you have concerns about coming up with the money to consult with an attorney, you can take comfort in knowing that you do not have to write a check. All reputable personal injury lawyers work the same way. They will never send you hourly bills or charges for their time. They work on a contingency basis.

When they speak about your case with you for the first time, the consultation is completely free and comes at no risk to you. If you choose not to hire a lawyer, you will not get a bill for the consultation. If you agree to retain the lawyer, you only pay them if they win your case.

Why Would You Hesitate?

gary annes, abels & annes, p.c.
Truck Accident Attorney, Gary Annes

With all of these reasons to call a truck accident lawyer as soon as possible following your accident, why would you wait? There are experienced legal teams in your area ready to help, and the first step is to call for a free case evaluation.

In this evaluation, you can tell your side of the story, provide additional information to the attorney, and ask questions. You want to hire the right truck accident lawyer for your situation.


Abels & Annes
100 N LaSalle St #1710
Chicago, IL 60602
(312) 924-7575

​How to Make Trucks More Accident-Safe

Even though truck accident numbers are increasing, truck safety has improved over the past two decades. The driver has enhanced accident-prevention technology. However, in the absence of federal regulations that require specific systems, these safety options are optional. It is up to the trucking company to make the investments necessary to keep their trucks from injuring motorists and their passengers.

Economically, investing in safety should make sense for trucking companies. Large lawsuit verdicts threaten to put them out of business. There have been many cases where juries have issued “nuclear verdicts” that bankrupted trucking companies that did not have the assets to pay them.

Many trucking companies will not spend the money it takes on systems that enhance the safety of their trucks, as they are an expense that can cut back on profits. Some trucking companies will regret this choice when their drivers cause severe injuries in accidents that were avoidable with safety technology. Then, the trucking company can face massive liability when one of its drivers causes an accident.

Here are some ways a trucking company can make a truck safer, either through investment in technology or people and processes.

Hire More Experienced Drivers

There are no two ways around it; truck driver wages are increasing as there is a shortage of qualified truck drivers. Experienced operators can command higher wages because there are not enough of them to go around. Trucking companies compensate for spiraling wages by hiring less experienced drivers, who earn less. This is a foolish approach because poor safety will affect the bottom line more.

Hiring experienced drivers is an investment in safety. While these drivers cost more, they have a track record and know-how to operate these large vehicles.

On the flip side, cutting corners to hire newer drivers because they make less puts motorists at risk. It also puts the trucking company in legal jeopardy because these newer drivers have a far greater chance of causing an accident. Truck drivers with less than five years of experience are 41 percent more likely to cause a crash.

Perform Vigorous Checks on Drivers

Trucking companies have many obligations when they hire new drivers. In addition to each driver needing a CDL license and training courses, trucking companies must strictly check on the people they employ. The first check is of the driver’s safety history. Trucking companies must check driving records for three years before hiring a driver. If the driver has a poor safety record, the trucking company should think twice about hiring them in the face of obvious red flags. In addition, the trucking company must perform drug and alcohol tests on their drivers.

Trucking companies should not overlook a history of safety violations because they need warm bodies to throw behind the wheel. After all, operators are driving 80,000-pound vehicles that far outweigh the cars they may potentially hit. Cutting corners on background checks and compromising safety standards can cost far more money than they save.

Perform All Necessary Maintenance

Even the slightest malfunction can cause a severe crash because it is such a large vehicle. The first thing that comes to mind is that one tire blowout can cause the truck driver to lose control of the vehicle and hit another car. There are many maintenance requirements trucking companies and truck drivers must follow.

Before the driver even heads out onto the road, they must perform specific checks of vital parts of the truck. If they find anything wrong, they must report it. They are not allowed to repair their own trucks.

The trucking company has a legal obligation to keep the truck working properly.

Extensive federal regulations govern truck inspections and maintenance:

  • Trucking companies must periodically inspect, maintain and repair all vehicles subject to their control
  • Accessories and parts must always be in safe working condition at all times
  • Truck drivers must not operate commercial vehicles in a manner that might cause a crash or breakdown

When trucking companies cut back on maintenance to save money, it often comes back to bite their bottom line, either due to an enforcement penalty or a lawsuit. Investing in maintenance is a smart way to protect the trucking company from liability.

Follow Regulations in Loading Cargo

Even if the driver does everything right, the truck’s cargo can cause an accident. Again, federal regulations dictate strict measures that crews must follow when loading cargo. Loaders must properly tie down cargo using structures of adequate strength.

Proper cargo loading is critical for several reasons:

  • If cargo is unbalanced or moves while the truck is in operation, it can cause a truck rollover.
  • Cargo can spill from the truck onto the roadway, causing driver crashes.

Trucking companies may outsource cargo loading, and the third party will be legally responsible if improper cargo loading causes an accident. In addition, you can hold the trucking company responsible if it negligently hired a cargo loader.

Blind-Spot Detection Systems

Trucks have large blind spots both in front and behind them, and along each side of the trailer. The truck driver will have difficulty seeing the first 20 feet in front of the truck and 30 feet behind it. The lack of vision makes it difficult for the truck to change lanes. Inexperienced drivers may struggle when relying on their mirrors to alert them a car is in a blind spot.

A blind-spot detection system has sensors on the mirrors and bumpers that alert a truck driver when a vehicle is in a blind spot. The driver will receive an alert. Then, the system may beep or give another warning if a truck driver changes lanes when a car is in a blind spot. These warnings keep a truck from hitting a driver or forcing them out of their lane when trying to change lanes.

Blind-spot detection systems can be expensive to buy and maintain. The network of sensors is complex, and they often need replacements. However, they reduce the chances of a serious or possibly deadly blind spot accident.

Collision Warning Systems

A collision warning system will alert a truck driver when the risk of an accident rises. This system can help operators who may not see the danger, either because they have made a judgment error or are distracted. Collision warning systems also help truckers on long journeys who may become distracted. These systems do not substitute for following rest rules, but they are another tool drivers have to help avoid accidents.

Collision warning systems are often on newer trucks. Most trucking companies have not retrofitted their older fleets to include this technology because they do not want to spend the money.

Automatic Braking

Automatic braking systems will apply the brakes when the computer senses a truck accident is imminent. The braking can either stop the truck entirely or slow the truck down to reduce the accident’s severity.

Trucks take far longer to bring to a stop, given their size and weight. If truck drivers are distracted, even a split-second delay in applying the brakes can mean the truck has an accident.

Automatic braking systems can practically end rear-end truck collisions. One study found automatic braking systems cut rear-end collisions by nearly 75 percent. Right now, these systems are not mandatory for trucks. The hope is that future regulations can mandate automatic braking systems to protect the public from tired and distracted drivers who either do not attempt to brake in time or misjudge their stopping distance.

Electronic Logging Device Compliance

Truck drivers must follow strict federal rules about hours of service limitations. Operators must take mandatory rest breaks, and their shifts cannot exceed certain durations. In the past, truckers manually kept a logbook that detailed their shifts. However, manual books are insufficient to protect the public. They may be subject to falsification.

Now, trucks have an electronic system that tracks the time the truck is in operation. Some trucks even have devices that do not allow drivers to start the truck if they violate the federal rules. This system is the equivalent of an ignition interlock that tests drivers with a history of DUI.

This lock is in use on very few trucks. Nonetheless, investing in upgraded technology to keep drivers from violating federal rules because of the delivery pressure feel can reduce fatigued driving accidents. Nonetheless, these devices are not substitutes for good judgment and the driver taking necessary rests.

Lane Departure Warning

Fatigued or distracted drivers may drift out of their lane. Truck drivers may have difficulty stabilizing their truck and keeping it straight. A lane departure warning system will alert the driver when the truck veers out of its lane. This can allow the driver the correct course. If the driver has lost concentration, the sudden sound can force them to regain focus.

These systems have mounted cameras that track lane dividers and the truck’s position. Lane departure warning systems are complicated pieces of technology that require some investment. However, since many truck accidents happen due to drifting trucks, the investment is well worth it because it protects the truck and the trucking company. Lane departure warning systems are perhaps the most effective measures to combat distracted trucking accidents.

Stability Control System

Truck rollovers are a common and dangerous type of accident. There are several causes of rollovers:

  • The driver makes a steering error
  • The cargo is improperly loaded, causing the center of gravity to shift
  • An inexperienced driver misjudges a turn

Stability control systems are a required feature on later trucks in the wake of a 2015 federal regulation. Trucking companies can still retrofit older vehicles with this crucial device.

The stability control system can prevent rollovers by performing two major functions:

  • Manipulates the engine throttle
  • Manipulates the brakes over each wheel

Studies show these devices can prevent thousands of truck accidents each year. NHTSA has proposed making stability control systems mandatory for passenger cars and light trucks. These systems are also mandatory for trucks built after 2015, although trucking companies are not required to retrofit older trucks to install this system. However, for purposes of safety, trucking companies should consider this investment.

Underride Guards

Accidents involving a car that ends up under a truck are extremely devastating. These accidents can shear off the top of the car, decapitating motorists.

Underride guards help lessen the chance a car driver can end up under the truck when they crash into the back of a tractor-trailer. These guards are not yet a requirement by law, but there is proposed legislation for such requirements that legislators may enact in the future. Underride guards do not require a large investment, but they can cut the risk of a catastrophic accident.

Again, it is up to the trucking how much to spend on certain safety features when they are not a federal requirement. Trucking companies must comply with all federal rules, but they may not want to pay for the “extras.” They may regret it when they face an angry jury and a sympathetic plaintiff who suffered serious injuries in an accident.

Dave Abels
Truck Accident Lawyer, Dave Abels

These safety devices lower the chances that a truck driver can be negligent and can save an operator from their lack of skill or poor judgment. If the truck driver was negligent, and you or a loved one suffered injuries, you may have the right to financial compensation. First, you need to contact an experienced truck accident lawyer for a free consultation.

A lawyer can determine whom you can hold liable for your losses. That is often the trucking company. Even if trucking companies took all possible safety measures, they are still liable for the mistakes and negligence of employees – the truck drivers. You want a truck accident attorney who knows how to investigate truck crashes, gather evidence of negligence, and prove liability so you can seek compensation.


Abels & Annes
100 N LaSalle St #1710
Chicago, IL 60602
(312) 924-7575

Phoenix Unqualified Truck Drivers

It takes highly specialized knowledge and a set of driver’s skills to safely operate a truck. Drivers who want to operate commercial vehicles must obtain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) after knowledge tests and rigorous training.

Unfortunately, despite the strict regulations and requirements for truck drivers across the United States, quite a few unqualified truckers drive on our roads. Trucking accidents often happen because of truck driver error or poor judgment, which is often the result of a lack of qualifications or experience.

If you were in a motor vehicle accident with a large truck, speak with a skilled truck accident attorney to determine whether the truck driver had the necessary qualifications, training, and license.

What Are the Minimum Requirements for Truck Drivers?

To keep everyone on the road safe and ensure that unqualified drivers are not allowed to drive trucks, the U.S. Department of Transportation has established minimum requirements for those who want to become operators of commercial vehicles.

Under 49 CFR § 391.11, drivers must meet the following requirements to operate commercial vehicles:

  • 18 years old or older (if the truck wants to drive across state lines or transport hazardous materials, they must be at least 21 years of age)
  • Have a valid driver’s license
  • Have two or more years of driving experience
  • Have a medical examiner’s certificate confirming that the driver meets all physical and medical requirements to safely operate a truck
  • There is no current suspension of their driver’s license.

If a driver does not meet these requirements, they may lack the necessary qualifications to safely operate a commercial vehicle. Drivers must also pass a knowledge and road test before receiving a commercial driver’s license. Just because a driver has a CDL does not mean that he or she cannot lose it. Specific traffic law violations may result in CDL disqualification.

What Makes a Truck Driver ‘Unqualified’?

Becoming a truck driver requires people to undergo rigorous training and have years of driving experience. In the context of truck accidents, the term “unqualified truck drivers” refers to drivers who operate commercial vehicles without a valid CDL, those who drive without the proper endorsement on their license, and those who had their CDL suspended.

However, a truck driver may be “unqualified” even if they have a valid CDL but still lack the necessary skills and experience to safely operate a commercial vehicle.

When undergoing training, truck drivers must develop the following skills:

  • Safely entering and exiting roadways
  • Making proper lane changes
  • Using and aligning the truck’s mirrors
  • Avoiding blind spots
  • Following hours of service rules
  • Inspecting their vehicle for potential mechanical failure before the trip
  • Being aware of substance abuse and cell phone use regulations

A truck driver must know all these things to be qualified to operate the vehicle safely. Under the DOT requirements, a commercial driver’s license remains valid for five years, which means a driver must go through the renewal process after five years pass.

What Are the Dangers of Unqualified Truck Drivers?

While some driving maneuvers, including turns and lane changes, may seem easy for drivers of passenger vehicles, they may be difficult to execute for those who operate trucks weighing up to 80,000 pounds and large blind spots and an increased braking distance.

Operating a heavy and large truck is not easy, which is why strict requirements are in place to ensure that operators of commercial vehicles have the necessary qualifications and proper licensing and training to drive on public roads.

Unfortunately, the truck driver shortage has caused many trucking companies to hire drivers who are not qualified or experienced enough to drive commercial vehicles.

Some of the driving mistakes that unqualified drivers are likely to make include:

  • Making unsafe lane changes
  • Making improper turns
  • Driving too fast for conditions
  • Not stopping in time to avoid a collision
  • Failing to follow a safe distance between vehicles
  • Not checking blind spots before executing maneuvers
  • Failing to keep a proper lookout

Unqualified truck drivers pose a danger to themselves and everyone on the road with them. If a truck driver does not have the proper licensing, qualifications, or training, they are more likely to make mistakes when operating a truck and cause devastating and potentially deadly accidents.

What You Need to Know About Unqualified Truck Drivers

When determining liability for an accident caused by an unqualified truck driver, you should know:

  1. Trucking companies often hire unqualified drivers to increase their revenue. According to the American Trucking Associations, the truck driver shortage hit a historic high of over 80,000 drivers in 2021. The shortage of truck drivers has caused many trucking companies to disregard federal regulations and hire truckers with invalid, suspended, or even non-existent CDLs in an attempt to increase their revenue. In addition, the trucking company may be more likely to ignore violations, including substance abuse, committed by the driver to keep him or her working and transporting materials for the company.
  2. A truck driver may not have the necessary endorsement on their CDL to operate certain vehicles. A truck driver needs specific enforcement on their CDL to drive certain types of commercial vehicles. If the driver operates a commercial vehicle despite the lack of endorsement to drive that vehicle, they are unqualified to drive.

If you are involved in a truck accident and believe that the truck driver is not qualified or licensed to operate a commercial vehicle, you might want to consult with a knowledgeable attorney to investigate your accident and access the trucking company’s records to check the driver’s past driving history, qualifications, licensing, and training.

Truck Drivers Can Become Ineligible to Operate Commercial Vehicles

Just because a truck driver has obtained a commercial driver’s license does not mean that the driver cannot lose the license. Commercial vehicle drivers must follow traffic laws and maintain clean driving records to avoid the loss of a CDL.

While the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) does not revoke a commercial vehicle driver’s CDL for all traffic law violations, a driver can become ineligible to operate commercial vehicles if they:

  • Operate a truck with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .04 percent or greater (the standard BAC limit for regular drivers is .08 percent);
  • Violate implied consent laws by refusing to take a breath or blood test;
  • Leave the scene of an accident;
  • Use the CDL to commit a felony; or
  • Cause someone else’s death as a result of their negligent, careless, or reckless operation of the truck.

The duration of the CDL disqualification can range from a few months to several years or even ten years. In some cases, the truck driver may have their CDL disqualified for life.

What Are the Federal Requirements to Qualify as a Truck Driver?

While state authorities can issue commercial driver’s licenses, truck drivers must also meet the federal requirements to be fully qualified drivers.

Some of the most fundamental qualifications for truck drivers include:

  1. Physical and medical examination. A truck driver must undergo a physical and medical examination to obtain a Medical Examiner’s Certificate issued by the U.S. DOT. The certificate confirms that the truck driver has been screened and evaluated by medical professionals to ensure that they are qualified to drive a commercial vehicle safely. During the examination, the doctor will check a driver’s health to ensure that they do not have any conditions that can cause them to pass out or otherwise lose control of the vehicle while driving.
  2. Periodic and random testing for alcohol, drugs, and other impairing substances. Trucking companies across the country must follow strict regulations for alcohol and drug testing. If a truck driver fails a test or refuses to undergo testing, their trucking company must not allow that driver to continue driving.
  3. Hours of service regulations. Driving while fatigued is a common cause of truck accidents across the country. To prevent truck drivers from falling asleep behind the wheel and operating trucks while fatigued, the FMCSA established strict hours of service rules to ensure that drivers get adequate rest and sleep. Under the FMCSA hours of service regulations, drivers of property-carrying trucks cannot drive for longer than 11 hours after ten consecutive hours off duty. The hours of service limit for drivers of passenger-carrying vehicles is ten hours after eight consecutive hours off duty.

A truck driver is not fully qualified if they do not meet these and other requirements established by federal law.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Unqualified Truck Drivers

What are the common accidents caused by unqualified truck drivers?

Causes of accidents involving unqualified truck drivers vary from one case to another.

Some of the most common causes of unqualified truck driver accidents include:

  • Running red lights
  • Failure to maintain a safe following distance
  • Driving too fast for conditions
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs
  • Driving while fatigued
  • Making unsafe lane changes
  • Failing to properly secure loads
  • Failing to conduct pre-trip inspections

When a truck driver causes a collision because of their lack of qualifications or training, they can be liable for the resulting damages and losses. However, the injured victim might also file a claim against the trucker’s employer. Trucking companies can be liable for the crash, especially if they hire drivers they know or should have known were incompetent or unqualified at the time of the hiring.

How do I know that an unqualified truck driver caused my accident?

Typically, truck drivers do not admit that they are not qualified or licensed when a collision occurs. This begs the question, “How do you know that the truck driver who caused your accident is unqualified?

In most cases, you cannot know for sure that the trucker who caused your accident lacks the necessary qualifications to operate a large truck. However, when you hire an attorney to conduct an investigation, the attorney will review the truck driver’s credentials and records to determine if the driver is qualified.

Proving that the truck driver is not qualified can help you maximize your recovery because you might file a claim against both the unqualified truck driver and their trucking company.

Are trucking companies liable for accidents due to unqualified truck drivers?

If an unqualified truck driver is responsible for causing your crash, they can be liable for the collision and any resulting damages and losses. Unfortunately, however, you may not receive adequate compensation from an unqualified driver because the driver may also not have the proper insurance coverage.

In this case, your truck accident lawyer might maximize your compensation by filing a claim against the truck driver’s employer – the trucking company. Trucking companies must conduct background checks and check drivers’ credentials to ensure that they are hiring qualified and competent drivers to operate large trucks.

What compensation can you seek after a truck accident due to an unqualified driver?

If your truck accident occurred because the driver is not qualified or experienced enough, you might be entitled to compensation for your resulting injuries, damages, and losses.

Depending on your injuries and losses, you might recover the following types of damages:

  • Medical expenses (past and future), including hospitalization bills, surgery costs, and other expenses associated with the treatment
  • Loss of income and diminished earning capacity
  • Pain and suffering and other emotional trauma
  • Loss of enjoyment of life

In some states, courts also award punitive damages to punish the at-fault party for their outrageous conduct. Get a case review from an experienced attorney in your area to determine the damages available in your truck accident case.

How can an attorney help you prove that a truck driver is unqualified?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Personal Injury Lawyer

Proving that a truck driver who caused an accident does not have the necessary qualifications, licensing, or training can be tough primarily because the injured party does not have access to the trucking company’s records.

That is why you need an attorney to help you obtain access to and review the trucker’s training certifications, qualifications, vehicle maintenance logs, hiring records, and other information to prove that the truck driver is unqualified.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

A Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer Can Help You With a T-Bone Accident

While T-bone accidents are not as common as rear-end collisions, they can result in devastating injuries and significant property damage, especially when the crash involves large trucks. A large percentage of T-bone accidents involving semi-trucks, tractor-trailers, and other trucks result in deaths.

A massive truck hitting the side of a smaller vehicle can cause life-changing and sometimes fatal injuries to car occupants. These collisions are so deadly because large trucks can weigh up to 80,000 pounds.

If you suffered injuries or your loved one died in a truck T-bone accident, consider contacting a skilled attorney to evaluate your damages and help you pursue the compensation you need to put your life back together.

What Is a T-Bone Accident?

T-bone accidents, also sometimes called side-impact collisions, occur when the front of one vehicle strikes the left or right side of another vehicle, forming the shape of a “T” between the vehicles. A large percentage of T-bone collisions occur at intersections when one of the drivers fails to obey traffic signals or stop signs.

However, T-bone collisions involving large trucks may also occur on interstates, highways, and roadways when a driver loses control of the vehicle, makes an improper turn, or violates other traffic rules. These accidents may also occur in parking lots when one vehicle strikes the side of another car when exiting their parking space.

Common Causes of Truck T-Bone Accidents

Many T-bone accidents occur at intersections with traffic signals and stop signs.

Thus, the vast majority of side-impact collisions are preventable if drivers consistently obey traffic laws and use reasonable care when operating a motor vehicle.

  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. An intoxicated motorist is more likely to disobey traffic laws due to their impaired judgment, slower reaction, and inability to drive safely.
  • Failure to yield the right of way. After driving too fast for conditions and impaired driving, failure to yield the right of way is the third-leading cause of fatal traffic accidents in the United States, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Failure to yield is also a common cause of T-bone collisions.
  • Not coming to a complete stop. If a driver fails to come to a complete stop at a red light or stop sign, they may end up colliding with vehicles that legally enter the intersection.
  • Running red lights. A large percentage of side-impact crashes that occur at intersections happen because a driver attempts to beat a red light.
  • Driving too fast for weather conditions. Adverse weather conditions contribute to motor vehicle accidents in our country, including truck T-bone accidents. When a driver fails to slow down and drive at a rate of speed that is reasonable for weather conditions is more likely to cause a car accident.

However, driver error is not the only cause of T-bone collisions.

These crashes may also occur due to the following factors:

  • Defective or faulty automobile parts
  • Poorly maintained roads
  • Faulty traffic signals

The cause of a side-impact collision may not be immediately apparent after the accident, which is why victims involved in the crash might want to consider hiring an experienced attorney to investigate their accident and determine fault.

Why Are T-Bone Collisions Dangerous?

T-bone accidents are dangerous and can be deadly for several reasons. In this type of crash, the front of a vehicle strikes the side of another vehicle. The side of the vehicle is one of its weakest spots when collisions happen. Although some vehicles have airbags on their sides, they may still offer little to no protection to the driver or vehicle passengers, especially if the accident occurs at a high rate of speed and/or involves a large truck.

If the vehicle does not have airbags, the consequences of a side-impact collision can be deadly. T-bone crashes can result in catastrophic injuries and fatalities in both vehicles, the one that strikes the side of another and the one that takes the hit.

The severity of injuries and the likelihood of death in truck T-bone accidents depends on multiple factors, including the speed of the vehicles as well as the size of the vehicle that strikes the side of another.

Common Injuries Suffered by Victims of Truck T-Bone Accidents

Some of the most common injuries associated with T-bone collisions involving trucks include but are not limited to:

  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Paralysis
  • Back and neck injuries
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Broken bones and fractures
  • Loss of a limb
  • Severe burns
  • Penetrating injuries
  • Crush injuries

Often, injuries suffered by victims of truck T-bone accidents can lead to life-long impairments. Depending on the severity of the injury, the injured victim may be disabled for the rest of their life and incur hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical expenses, loss of income, and other costs and losses.

If you were involved in a T-bone crash, it is critical to seek medical attention as soon as possible. Even if you feel fine, you might still want to visit a doctor to get a full medical check-up. Some injuries may not be apparent immediately after the accident. Symptoms can take hours, days, or even weeks to surface.

Negligence in T-Bone Accidents

If you suffered injuries in a T-bone accident, your ability to obtain compensation for your damages and losses depends on your ability to prove that the other driver was negligent. Negligence refers to a person’s failure to act reasonably under the circumstances.

According to the American Bar Association (ABA), a person is negligent if they fail to use reasonable care.

In a car accident, you can establish negligence if you or your lawyer can prove:

  1. Duty of care. The other driver owed you a duty of care. For example, if your T-bone accident involves a truck, you can prove that the driver of the truck owed you a duty to operate the vehicle safely and obey traffic laws.
  2. Breach. The truck driver breached their duty of care due to their unlawful or careless conduct behind the wheel. For example, if the truck driver failed to stop at a red light, which caused them to hit the side of your vehicle in a T-bone manner, you can prove that the driver breached the duty of care.
  3. Causation. This element requires you to prove that you suffered injuries and damages as a direct result of the truck driver’s negligence.
  4. Damages. Last but not least, you must prove that you suffered actual damages (economic and non-economic) because of your injury.

If your attorney can establish these four elements after a T-bone collision, you can receive compensation through a personal injury claim against the driver of the truck.

Can a Trucking Company Bear Liability for Your Truck T-Bone Accident?

Yes, you can hold a trucking company liable for your T-bone collision if you can prove that the company was negligent in causing the accident. Common examples of negligence on the part of a trucking company are negligent supervision, hiring, or training of drivers.

A trucking company can be liable for your accident if it failed to follow the federal regulations that the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) enforces. For example, the Hours of Service (HoS) regulations prohibit truck operators from driving more than 11 hours after ten consecutive hours off duty.

If a trucking company encourages its drivers to violate HoS rules, and one of its drivers causes a T-bone accident when they fall asleep behind the wheel, the trucking company can be liable for the resulting damages because it disregarded the federal regulations.

Another example of a trucking company’s negligence is if it failed to conduct proper background checks before hiring a truck driver who has problems with alcohol or drug abuse.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Truck T-Bone Accidents

How common are truck T-bone accidents?

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), T-bone accidents account for approximately 23 percent of all fatalities among passenger vehicle occupants in the United States. Side-impact collisions account for over 5,000 passenger vehicle occupant fatalities on our roads.

A large percentage of fatalities in T-bone accidents involve large trucks. The size of the truck increases the chance of a fatal collision. In Arizona, angle crashes, which include side-impact collisions, accounted for over 4,300 injuries, according to a 2020 report by the Arizona Department of Transportation.

Why do trucks make T-bone accidents worse?

Semi-trucks, tractor-trailers, and other trucks are much larger and weigh significantly more than passenger vehicles. Thus, when a T-bone crash involves a large truck, the consequences can be catastrophic and deadly.

The fact that trucks are carrying cargo makes T-bone collisions even more dangerous. If the truck’s cargo spills onto the road, more people can get hurt from hazards at the scene of the crash.

How do you determine fault in T-bone accidents?

A large percentage of T-bone collisions occur when two vehicles enter the intersection at the same time. More often than not, at least one driver is at fault for this type of accident. For example, if a driver runs a red light or disobeys a stop sign, they can be held liable for any resulting collisions.

The police officer who arrives at the scene of the T-bone collision will determine fault. The officer will evaluate the circumstances of the crash to determine who had the right of way based on traffic signals and road signs in the area. However, in many cases, the fault may not be immediately apparent, which is why people involved in the collision will have to contact an attorney to investigate the collision and determine fault.

When determining liability for a truck T-bone accident, an attorney will collect and review all available evidence, including photos from the scene, skid marks, witness statements, surveillance or traffic camera footage, and others.

What compensation can you recover after a truck T-bone accident?

A T-bone collision can result in thousands of dollars in expenses and losses. Fortunately, you can pursue compensation for any losses and damages related to your crash if the other party (e.g., a truck driver and/or their trucking company) was responsible for causing the accident.

Some of the most common types of damages recoverable by victims of T-bone accidents include:

  • Medical expenses
  • Lost wages
  • Property damages
  • Diminished earning capacity
  • Loss of enjoyment of life
  • Pain and suffering

Keep all receipts and records related to your losses and expenses in a secure place. You will need that documentation to obtain the compensation that you need to cover your losses.

What if your loved one died in a truck T-bone collision?

If you lost a loved one in a side-impact collision caused by a large truck, you can pursue a wrongful death lawsuit against the negligent party. While it is understandable that no money in the world can bring back your loved one, you and the surviving family members can achieve justice and receive compensation for some of your hardships by filing a wrongful death lawsuit. Consider speaking with an attorney to help you understand your compensation options when suing the negligent party for causing your loved one’s death.

How can an attorney help after a truck T-bone accident?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

If you suffered injuries or your family member lost their life in a T-bone collision involving a truck, you can benefit from contacting a knowledgeable truck accident attorney to represent your interests and protect your rights.

Your attorney can help you pursue the compensation you deserve by:

  • Investigating your accident
  • Gathering evidence to prove the other party’s fault
  • Preparing and filing the necessary paperwork
  • Handling communications with insurance companies and at-fault parties
  • Negotiating a fair settlement on your behalf
  • Taking your case to court if doing so is necessary to obtain maximum compensation

Speak with an experienced truck accident attorney to discuss your particular case and determine your best course of action to receive the compensation you need to obtain justice and hold the other party accountable for their negligent or wrongful conduct.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

When Trucks Roll Over in Phoenix

Trucks can roll over onto their side when abruptly turning, suddenly changing direction, or hitting an obstacle with one of their wheels. Trucks, large vans, and SUVs are more likely to roll over than other vehicles due to their higher center of gravity.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), rollover accidents account for about one-fifth of all fatal traffic crashes on U.S. roads.

Just one wrong maneuver can result in a devastating truck rollover accident. Truck drivers receive training to learn to carefully consider the maneuverability, limitations, and the higher center of gravity of their vehicles when making quick steering maneuvers. The vast majority of rollover accidents involving large trucks occur due to negligence on the part of the trucker.

A truck rollover crash can not only injure the driver of the big rig that rolls over but also other drivers, motorcyclists, bicyclists, and pedestrians around the overturned truck. These accidents tend to cause deaths and disabling injuries.

If you or someone you love suffered injuries in a rollover-related accident, consider contacting an experienced Phoenix truck accident attorney to determine liability and explore your options for compensation.

Causes of Truck Rollovers

According to a study, a tractor-trailer or another big rig is most likely to roll over when the vehicle performs a maneuver that causes the weight of the vehicle or its cargo to shift abruptly.

There are many causes and contributing factors to rollover accidents involving trucks, including:

  • Speeding – The risk of a rollover accident increases substantially when a truck driver is speeding or traveling too fast for road or weather conditions. According to the above-mentioned NHTSA report, the propensity to roll over is higher on roads where the posted speed limit is over 55 miles per hour.
  • Turning or swerving abruptly – When a truck turns or swerves too quickly to avoid a hazard, the vehicle is likely to roll over onto its side due to a dramatic shift of the truck’s weight or cargo.
  • Undergoing sharp and sudden curves – Sharp curves can cause big rigs to roll over because of the sudden shift of the truck’s center of gravity. A rollover accident is likely to occur if the truck driver fails to slow down when undergoing a sharp curve.
  • Driving with an overloaded trailerFederal regulations for cargo loading limits exist for a reason. When the trailer is overloaded, a truck is more likely to roll over because the vehicle is carrying more than it can handle. Driving with an overloaded trailer puts too much stress on the vehicle’s tires and brakes, which may result in tire blowouts and contribute to a rollover.
  • Shifting cargo – When cargo in the trailer is not properly loaded, a truck is more likely to roll over due to shifting cargo. The driver of the truck is more likely to lose control of the vehicle and end up in a rollover accident when cargo loads in the trailer are unbalanced or improperly loaded.
  • Getting distracted behind the wheel – A truck driver talking on the phone or using his cell phone to send or read a text message is more likely to make bad maneuvering decisions that can cause the truck to roll over.
  • Driving while fatiguedFatigued driving is just as dangerous as distracted driving. A fatigued truck driver may have a slower reaction time and impaired judgment, which can contribute to the likelihood of errors when operating a tractor-trailer or semi-truck.
  • Falling asleep behind the wheel – When a driver is too exhausted due to spending too many hours on the road without rest, they are more likely to fall asleep behind the wheel and experience a rollover. Federal hours of service rules aim to prevent fatigue and drowsy driving, but too many truckers ignore those rules and drive more without the required rest periods.
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugsDriving while impaired by alcohol or drugs can impair the intoxicated driver’s judgment, reaction time, motor coordination, and concentration. All of these factors can make it impossible to operate a truck safely. As a result, rollover and other preventable accidents are likely to happen due to the trucker’s intoxication.
  • Making unsafe lane changes – Big rigs are likely to experience a rollover when the truck or another vehicle on the road makes an unsafe lane change. Common examples of unsafe lane changes include cutting another vehicle off, failing to signal one’s intention to change lanes, and failing to check blind spots when changing lanes.
  • Experiencing mechanical failures – Not all truck rollover accidents occur as a result of driver error. Mechanical failures or defects can also contribute to rollovers. A truck can roll over onto its side when the vehicle experiences problems with the braking or steering system, especially if the tractor-trailer or semi-truck is traveling at high speeds. Mechanical failures can cause a driver to lose control of the vehicle.
  • Experiencing low tire pressure – Trucks traveling with low tire pressure can lose road traction and end up in a rollover accident. Problems with the tires can also cause instability when speeding and making turns, which contributes to rollovers.
  • Driving in inclement weather – Adverse weather conditions increase the risk of rollovers because drivers are more likely to lose control of the vehicle when driving on wet or slippery surfaces. Fog and rain can also impair visibility, which is why a driver may not notice a curb, pothole, debris, or other hazards on the road that cause them to perform a quick swerving maneuver or hit the obstacle with one of the truck’s wheels.

Rollover accidents can happen for many reasons, ranging from driver error and mechanical failures to bad weather. If you are not sure what caused a truck to roll over in your situation, consider speaking with an experienced lawyer to conduct a thorough investigation and determine what caused your rollover accident.

Can You Sue a Trucking Company for a Truck Rollover Accident?

Many victims of truck accidents mistakenly believe that they cannot hold a trucking company responsible for truck rollovers because thinking that there was no way the company could prevent the accident.

However, trucking regulations aim to prevent or reduce the risk of truck rollovers. Both truck drivers and trucking companies must follow these regulations to ensure everyone’s safety.

You can potentially sue a trucking company if you were injured in a truck rollover accident if your lawyer can prove that the company violated any of the following rules:

  • Conducting background checks and checking the qualifications and skills of drivers before hiring them;
  • Observing speed limits and setting realistic deadlines for truck drivers to discourage speeding;
  • Confirming that truckers comply with the federal hours of service rules, which prohibit truck drivers from driving for more than 11 hours in 14 hours after at least 10 consecutive hours off duty, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA);
  • Limiting operation of trucks in dangerous conditions (like bad weather that makes it unsafe to drive);
  • Installing and maintaining electronic stability control (ESC) systems, which aim to minimize the risk of rollovers;
  • Systematically inspecting trucks before every trip and maintaining them in good condition; and
  • Following federal regulations for transporting, loading, and securing cargo.

Following these and many other rules can help reduce rollover accidents involving trucks. If a trucking company fails to follow these rules and a truck rolls over, injured victims can hold the company liable for their injuries and losses.

Injuries in Truck Rollover Accidents

In many cases, injuries that motor vehicle occupants suffer in truck rollover accidents are devastating and life-threatening.

Common types of injuries resulting from rollover crashes include:

  • Crush injuries
  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Loss of a limb
  • Paralysis
  • Broken bones
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Internal injuries and bleeding

Depending on the nature and severity of the injury, victims may have to live with disabilities and might struggle to walk or work for the rest of their lives. When vehicle occupants do not wear a seatbelt, they are more likely to die and suffer catastrophic injuries in truck rollovers. According to the above-mentioned NHTSA report, nearly three-fourths of all vehicle occupants killed in rollovers were not wearing seat belts at the time of the accident.

What Damages Are Available in Truck Rollover Accidents?

When someone suffers injuries in a rollover accident, they can pursue compensation for their monetary and non-monetary damages by filing an insurance claim or lawsuit:

  • Economic damages refer to measurable losses incurred by the injured victim. Examples include medical bills, lost wages, out-of-pocket expenses, the cost of vehicle repairs, and others.
  • Non-economic damages are intangible losses that are more subjective than economic ones. Examples of non-monetary damages include loss of enjoyment of life, emotional distress, pain and suffering, and others.

You must understand what damages are available in your particular case and estimate the value of your claim when seeking compensation after a truck accident. A lawyer can review your particular situation to assess your damages and determine the settlement amount that will fairly compensate you for all your losses.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Rollover Accidents

Do Adverse Weather Conditions Contribute to Truck Rollovers?

Yes, trucks and other vehicles with a higher center of gravity are more likely to roll over in inclement weather. Bad weather conditions that contribute to rollover accidents include sleet, snow, ice, and rain.

Wet or slippery surfaces make it more difficult to control the vehicle, which is why a driver is more likely to make sudden steering and braking maneuvers. In addition to wet and slippery roads, high winds can contribute to rollovers because the wind can cause the driver to lose control of the vehicle.

Who Can Be Liable for Truck Rollover Accidents?

Statistically speaking, rollovers are more likely to cause deaths than other types of truck accidents. For this reason, it is vital to hold all liable parties accountable for their negligent conduct and failure to prevent a rollover.

Liability for a truck rollover depends on the circumstances of the accident. Depending on what caused the crash, the following parties can be responsible:

  • The truck driver
  • Another driver
  • The owner of the vehicle that rolled over
  • The trucking company
  • The company responsible for shipping or loading cargo
  • The company responsible for vehicle maintenance
  • Vehicle manufacturers

Negligence is the fault theory that creates the basis of liability in almost all truck accident cases, including those that involve rollovers. Consider speaking with an experienced lawyer to determine liability in your particular case.

What Evidence Do You Need to Prove Fault in a Truck Rollover Accident?

The strength of your case after a truck rollover accident depends on the availability of evidence in your case. If you suffered injuries in a truck rollover, you should gather as much evidence as possible to prove fault and obtain the compensation you deserve.

Valuable pieces of evidence in a rollover accident include:

  • The police report
  • Photos from the scene of the crash
  • Witness testimony
  • Videos footage showing the moment of the rollover
  • Your medical records
  • The truck’s black box data
  • The driver’s logbooks
  • The vehicle’s maintenance records
  • Information about cargo weight and loading

These and other pieces of evidence can be collected during a thorough investigation conducted by a knowledgeable lawyer. Consider contacting an attorney to help you gather all valuable evidence and present your case to the insurance company or the judge or jury in the most convincing manner possible.

Should You Hire a Truck Rollover Lawyer?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

While not all truck accident cases require the help of an attorney, those that involve catastrophic injuries, deaths, and/or multiple liable parties do. An experienced lawyer can help an injured victim seek compensation for their damages and losses by conducting a comprehensive investigation, collecting evidence, identifying liable parties, and pursuing a fair settlement amount on behalf of the victim.

A knowledgeable Phoenix truck accident attorney can take swift action to build a strong case, preserve evidence, and protect your legal rights after a truck rollover accident.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

Phoenix Truck Driver Fatigue

A truck driver’s actions when operating a truck require more care and caution due to the sheer size of their vehicle. However, when a driver is fatigued, they might not stay vigilant or exercise due care when driving due to sleep deprivation or exhaustion.

That is why the federal government sets restrictions on the number of hours truck drivers can drive without mandatory rest. Unfortunately, many truckers end up violating hours of service rules to drive longer distances and complete the deliveries faster.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, drowsy driving increases the risk of an accident because fatigue can result in mental impairment similar to being intoxicated. If you have sustained injuries in a truck accident caused by a fatigued driver, consider speaking with an attorney to assist you in pursuit of financial compensation.

Proving that the truck driver was fatigued can be difficult, which is why you might need the legal help of a skilled attorney to help you gather evidence and determine liability in your particular case.

What Is Truck Driver Fatigue?

Fatigued driving, also called “drowsy driving,” means operating a motor vehicle while sleepy or exhausted. Fatigue results from physical and/or mental exertion that impairs a person’s ability to drive a motor vehicle safely.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), drowsy driving caused nearly 700 deaths and thousands of injuries in 2019 alone. Operators of tractor-trailers, buses, and tow trucks are more likely to drive while fatigued than other drivers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

What Are the Federal Trucking Regulations to Prevent Truck Driver Fatigue?

Because fatigue is a major contributing factor to thousands of truck accidents, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) created regulations to put restrictions on the number of hours truck drivers can be on duty without a rest break.

The revised hours of service rules took effect on September 29, 2020.

The new hours of service regulations for truck drivers include:

  • A shift cannot exceed 14 hours if the driver is on a short-haul within the 150 air-mile radius;
  • The on-duty drive time extends by two hours in the event of adverse driving conditions;
  • A truck driver is required to take a 30-minute break by their eighth hour of coming on duty;
  • Truckers with a sleeper berth are required to take at least 8 hours in the sleeper berth; and
  • The time spent in the sleeper berth can happen over two periods as long as both periods exceed two hours.

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), truck drivers are twice as likely to crash when driving for more than eight hours in a workday. The IIHS research also showed that many truckers violate hours of service rules by driving for more hours than the allowed limit, not to mention that drivers routinely put false information in their logbooks.

Truck drivers who violate hours of service regulations and trucking companies that encourage their drivers to drive for more hours than allowed by federal law can be liable for any injuries and accidents caused by fatigue and drowsy driving.

The Dangers of Truck Driver Fatigue

As mentioned earlier, the National Sleep Foundation found that driving while fatigued compares to driving while impaired by alcohol. A fatigued driver is more likely to make errors and act negligently because sleep deprivation and exhaustion can impair judgment and slow reaction time.

Fatigue and tiredness can diminish a truck driver’s ability to operate a motor vehicle safely because of:

  • Impaired judgment
  • Decreased awareness
  • Slowed reaction time
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Poor coordination
  • Problems with vision
  • Behavioral changes

A fatigued driver is more likely to fall asleep behind the wheel. Exhaustion and sleepiness can also cause “microsleep,” which are episodes of sleep lasting less than 30 seconds. If a driver falls asleep behind the wheel, they can end up causing preventable accidents ranging from rear-end crashes and devastating head-on collisions.

Causes of Truck Driver Fatigue

Fatigue is a major contributing factor to thousands of truck accidents in Phoenix, Arizona, and elsewhere across the country. According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, fatigued driving or falling asleep behind the wheel caused an estimated 1,366 crashes in a recent year.

Many factors contribute to truck drivers’ fatigue, including:

  • Long hours – Truck drivers tend to spend long hours on the road, all alone. Driving long hours can lead to both physical and mental exertion.
  • Monotonous work routine – Most truck drivers have a monotonous work routine, which is why many of them are more likely to get bored and tired on the road.
  • Irregular sleep cycles – Many truck drivers prefer to drive at night because there is less traffic. However, driving at night and sleeping during the day can result in drowsiness due to irregular sleep cycles.
  • Shortage of truck drivers – According to the American Trucking Associations, the trucking industry was short nearly 61,000 drivers in 2019. Due to the shortage of truck drivers, the trucking company might impose unrealistic deadlines and push its drivers to their limits, which can result in fatigue and burnout.
  • Violating hours of service rules – As mentioned earlier, the FMCSA imposes strict limits on the number of hours a truck driver can drive during a shift without a rest period. Violations of the hours of service rules increase the likelihood of drowsy driving and fatigue.
  • Medical conditions – Some health issues may contribute to the truck driver’s fatigue, exhaustion, tiredness, or sleepiness.
  • Medication – Certain medications, including antidepressants and antihistamines, can cause drowsiness, which is why drivers of commercial vehicles must consult with a doctor before taking any medication that has “drowsiness,” “sleepiness,” or “tiredness” in its side effects.

Truck drivers must exercise due care when operating a truck, which is why truckers must stop driving and get rest as soon as they notice any signs of fatigue.

How to Prove Truck Driver Fatigue?

While the FMCSA estimates that driver fatigue factors in at least 13 percent of all truck accidents, proving that a truck driver caused the collision because they were fatigued is no easy task. Typically, you need a comprehensive investigation to prove that the other driver was fatigued at the time of the accident.

Thus, if you suffered injuries in a truck driver fatigue accident, you might need a lawyer to help you investigate your crash and collect all available evidence proving that the driver was drowsy or sleepy when the collision occurred.

To prove truck driver fatigue, you may need to show:

  • The time of the accident – If the collision occurred between midnight and morning hours, your lawyer can argue that the truck driver was drowsy and that their drowsiness played a role in causing the crash.
  • The police report – Police officers should recognize signs of intoxication and impairment caused by fatigue. If the officer believes that the truck driver has signs of fatigue, they may mention this fact in the police report.
  • Lack of accident avoidance – Typically, drivers make specific maneuvers in an attempt to avoid a collision. However, if the truck driver did not swerve or apply the brakes to avoid the crash, it can be an invaluable piece of evidence to prove that the driver had reduced reaction time and impaired judgment because of fatigue or the lack of sleep.
  • The driver’s logbook – Your lawyer will also examine the trucker’s logbook to determine how long the driver was on the road before the collision occurred. However, the problem with logbooks is that many drivers and even trucking companies falsify these records.
  • The driver’s billed hours – Since the driver’s logbook may not reveal the actual number of hours on the road, your lawyer can request access to the driver’s billed hours with their employer.

Consider contacting a skilled truck accident attorney to help you obtain all available evidence proving that the truck driver was fatigued.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Truck Driver Fatigue Accidents

What Are the Common Injuries that Truck Driver Fatigue Accidents Cause?

If a truck driver is fatigued—or worse, falls asleep behind the wheel—they are likely to cause severe injuries to occupants of passenger vehicles. Passenger car occupants are more vulnerable to injuries when involved in a collision with a large truck.

Victims of truck crashes caused by driver fatigue may sustain:

  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Paralysis
  • Concussion
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Back and neck injuries
  • Lacerations and cuts
  • Crush injuries
  • Broken bones/bone fractures
  • Internal bleeding
  • Severe burns

The severity of injuries depends on the type of the truck accident (head-on, rear-end, T-bone, etc.), the size of the truck, the speed, whether or not the victim was wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash, and other factors.

How to Prove the Fatigued Truck Driver’s Negligence?

If you have evidence to prove that the truck driver was fatigued or exhausted at the time of the accident and that their fatigue caused or contributed to the accident, you can hold the trucker responsible for your resulting injuries and losses.

To prove negligence in a truck accident, you may need the assistance of an experienced and seasoned lawyer to help you establish:

  1. The truck driver owed you a duty of care.
  2. The trucker breached the duty of care (e.g., because he fell asleep behind the wheel or had impaired judgment due to sleep deprivation).
  3. The breach led to the accident.
  4. You suffered injuries and financial losses after the crash.

Speak with an attorney to discuss your particular case and gather the necessary evidence to prove that the fatigued truck driver was negligent.

Can a Trucking Company Bear Liability for Truck Driver Fatigue?

Yes, the truck driver’s employer can be liable for the accident caused by the driver’s drowsiness or fatigue because trucking companies are vicariously liable for the accidents caused by their employees.

In some cases, you can sue the trucking company directly if you can prove that its negligence contributed to the collision. For example, if the truck driver’s employer imposed unrealistic deadlines for completing deliveries, which left the trucker no option but to violate the federal hours of service rules, the trucking company can be liable for the crash caused by the trucker’s fatigue.

Do Truck Drivers Have to Record Their Hours on Duty?

Yes, federal law requires truck drivers to record their hours on duty and rest breaks. However, since truck drivers keep paper logs to record their driving time, many drivers falsify those records. Thus, the truck driver’s logbooks may not show that the driver violated hours of service rules.

What Damages Can You Recover After a Phoenix Fatigued Truck Driver Accident?

Depending on the circumstances of your accident, you might be entitled to financial compensation through an insurance claim and a lawsuit against the liable parties.

Recoverable damages in truck accident cases include but are not limited to:

  • Reasonable medical expenses associated with the injury
  • Lost wages for the time missed at work
  • Diminished earning capacity
  • Pain and suffering
  • Loss of enjoyment of life
  • Emotional distress

If your loved one died in a truck accident caused by the other driver’s fatigue, you can seek compensation for the funeral and burial expenses, the cost of medical treatment before the death, loss of support, loss of income, loss of consortium, and other damages and losses.

How Can a Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer Help?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

To pursue financial compensation in your truck accident case, your lawyer may:

  • Answer your questions to ensure that you understand your legal options
  • Identify all potentially liable parties
  • Collect evidence proving that the truck driver was fatigued, sleepy, exhausted, or drowsy when the accident occurred
  • Calculate the value of damages and losses
  • Prepare the paperwork
  • File a claim or lawsuit
  • Handle all negotiations and communications throughout your legal case
  • Provide you with peace of mind while you focus on your getting better

Contact a knowledgeable Phoenix truck accident attorney if you suffered injuries in a truck accident caused by a driver’s drowsiness or you lost a loved one in a collision involving a fatigued driver.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

Phoenix Truck Blind Spots

Many accidents involving tractor-trailers, semi-trucks, 18-wheelers, and other large trucks occur when truck driver fails to check their blind spots. All truckers must exercise due care when operating a truck to avoid colliding with passenger cars, other trucks, motorcycles, bicycles, and pedestrians.

Truck accidents are not an uncommon occurrence on our roads. In a recent year, over 4,100 people died in collisions involving large trucks across the United States, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Occupants of passenger vehicles accounted for 67 percent of those fatalities.

Car drivers should know about a truck’s blind spots, known as no-zones when sharing the road with trucks. This can help avoid preventable crashes. Unfortunately, truckers can cause preventable accidents if they don’t check their blind spot accidents.

When someone suffers injuries in an accident that occurred due to a trucker’s failure to adequately monitor their blind spots, the injured victim may be entitled to financial compensation. If this happens to you, contact a Phoenix truck accident attorney immediately for an evaluation of your rights.

Where Are the Truck Blind Spots?

Blind spots refer to areas around a vehicle where a driver loses sight of other vehicles. When a vehicle is lingering in a truck’s blind spots, the truck driver cannot see it when checking their side mirrors.

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), trucks have blind spots on all four sides:

  1. In front of the truck. A blind zone of about 20 feet extends beyond the hood in front of the truck, preventing the trucker from seeing what is happening directly in front of them. A rear-end accident is likely to occur if a truck driver cannot see your car in front of their vehicle, especially if the truck is not following a safe distance.
  2. The driver’s side. The left-hand blind spot is smaller than the right-hand no-zone. However, it can still extend back to approximately one-third or half of the length of the trailer. If someone is lingering in this blind spot and the truck driver decides to merge into the left lane, a crash will likely occur.
  3. The passenger’s side. The no-zone on the truck’s right-hand side can be quite large, extending several lanes from the front of the vehicle to the rear of the trailer. This blind zone extends backward diagonally at a width of three lanes. If a car is lingering in the right-hand blind spot or is trying to pass the truck on the right, a collision is likely to occur if the truck driver changes lanes or makes a wide right turn.
  4. Behind the truck or trailer. Since trucks do not have rear-view mirrors inside the cab, truckers have no visibility for about 30 feet behind the truck or trailer. If other vehicles fail to keep a safe distance behind the truck, a rear-end or underride accident is likely to occur.

As a rule of thumb, if you cannot see your reflection in the truck’s side-view mirrors, you are in the truck’s blind spot and are invisible to the trucker.

The Dangers of Truck Blind Spots

While all vehicles have blind spots, trucks have massive no-zones due to their length and height. Because of the size of the truck, certain parts of the road are invisible to truck drivers.

Often, a truck driver cannot prevent a blind spot accident by checking side-view mirrors alone. A trucker may be required to look over their shoulder before performing dangerous maneuvers such as changing lanes, turning, or passing.

While it may not be possible to avoid entering a truck’s blind spots at all times, it is vital to understand when you are in those no-zones to avoid lingering for too long and make yourself as visible as possible.

If you remain invisible to a truck driver or linger in a blind spot for too long, the truck driver may not be aware of your presence near the truck and may crash into you when switching lanes or turning.

When a truck accident occurs because a trucker fails to properly clear their blind spots before maneuvering the truck, the injured victim can seek compensation for their injuries, property damage, and other losses. The help of a skilled lawyer may be necessary to hold the trucker and other liable parties, including the driver’s employer, responsible for the collision.

Causes of Truck Blind Spot Accidents

While truck blind spot accidents can occur for various reasons, a large percentage of such crashes occur due to driver error.

The most common causes of truck accidents involving blind spots include:

  1. Failing to maintain a safe distance
  2. Driving recklessly or aggressively
  3. Failing to signal lane changes or turns
  4. Exceeding the posted speed limit
  5. Cutting off other vehicles
  6. Failing to pay attention to the road
  7. Driving while fatigued or drowsy
  8. Driving while impaired by alcohol or drugs

Truck drivers are responsible for a large percentage of blind spot truck crashes.

An injured party may hold a trucker liable for the accident if the truck driver:

  • Drove under the influence of alcohol or drugs
  • Failed to check their side mirrors and look over their shoulder to clear blind spots before performing dangerous maneuvers
  • Lacked the necessary training or qualifications to drive large trucks
  • Failed to keep a proper lookout for vehicles around the truck
  • Failed to properly align the side mirrors to reduce no-zones
  • Got distracted by their cell phones or other mobile devices while operating a truck
  • Drove while fatigued, tired, or drowsy
  • Exceeded the speed limit or drove too fast for weather or road conditions
  • Violated federal trucking regulations

Often, a thorough and detailed investigation is necessary to determine fault in a truck accident.

Common Types of Truck Blind Spot Accidents

Truck accidents caused by a trucker’s failure to monitor blind spots can result in different types of crashes, including:

  • Rear-end collisions. This type of accident can occur when a truck rear-ends a vehicle in front of it or another vehicle collides with a truck from the rear. These accidents are common when a trucker fails to see a vehicle directly in front of them or behind the truck or trailer.
  • Sideswipe accidents. These collisions are likely to happen when another vehicle is trying to pass a truck on the left or right side, and the trucker decides to change lanes or turn.
  • Side-impact accidents. These crashes are also known as T-bone collisions. A side-impact accident occurs when a vehicle lingers in the truck’s side blind spot and then swerves into the front blind spot. As a result, the truck strikes the side of another vehicle.
  • Underride accidents. Underride crashes happen when a smaller vehicle gets crushed under the side or rear of a truck. A passenger car is likely to slide underneath the truck when the car lingers in the blind spot behind the truck or trailer.

According to the IIHS, a study showed that underride crashes accounted for about half of all fatal truck accidents.

Who Is Liable for Truck Blind Spot Accidents?

There may be multiple liable ties when truck accidents occur due to a trucker’s failure or inability to see other vehicles in the blind spots. In many cases, the truck driver is the only at-fault party when their negligence results in a preventable crash. However, a truck driver is not the only party that can be liable for a truck blind spot accident.

Liable parties may include:

  • The truck driver might be responsible for causing a crash if they failed to exercise due care when operating the truck. Common examples of a trucker’s negligence include failure to check side mirrors before maneuvering, driving while distracted by a cell phone, and speeding.
  • Other drivers. Truck drivers are not 100 percent at fault when collisions happen as a result of other vehicles lingering in the truck’s blind spots. For example, if another driver fails to maintain a safe distance, cuts off the truck, or otherwise fails to share the road with a truck with due care, the driver might be responsible for causing a collision. If that truck then crashes into your vehicle, you can seek compensation from the third driver, as well.
  • The truck driver’s employer (the trucking company). If a truck driver was driving in the course and scope of employment when the truck blind spot accident occurred, the injured party can file a claim against the trucking company that employed the trucker. For example, the truck driver’s employer can be liable if they were negligent in hiring the driver or failed to provide proper training to the employee.
  • The owner or manufacturer of the vehicle. If a collision was the result of a mechanical failure or defect, the injured party can potentially sue the owner or manufacturer of the vehicle. Vehicle owners must inspect and maintain their vehicles to prevent mechanical failures, while manufacturers can be liable when an accident occurs due to any defects of the vehicle.
  • A government entity. If road design or poor road conditions contributed to a trucking accident, the injured party can pursue a lawsuit against the government entity responsible for road maintenance. For example, if a truck driver makes an unexpected lane change to avoid hitting a pothole but does not notice a vehicle in his blind spots, you might hold the government entity accountable for negligent road maintenance.

A knowledgeable lawyer can conduct a detailed investigation of the facts of your blind spot truck accident to determine fault and identify all liable parties.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Truck Blind Spot Accidents

What Are the Most Dangerous Roads for Truck Accidents in Phoenix and Arizona?

Arizona has some dangerous roads that semi-truck, tractor-trailers, 18-wheelers, and other large trucks regularly use.

A large percentage of truck accidents occur on:

  • U.S. Highway 93
  • State Highway 87
  • State Route 64
  • Interstate 40
  • Interstate 60
  • Interstate 17
  • Interstate 10

According to the National Safety Council, Arizona accounts for only 6.4 percent of total large trucks involved in fatal accidents.

What Compensation Can You Receive After a Truck Blind Spot Accident?

If you suffered injuries in a truck blind spot accident—or any other accidents involving large trucks, for that matter—you are likely facing astronomical medical bills and dealing with other financial, physical, and emotional damages and losses. As a victim of a truck crash, you can seek compensation by pursuing a personal injury claim through an insurance company or filing a lawsuit against the at-fault party.

Depending on the severity of your injuries and the complexity of your case, you might receive compensation for the following damages:

  • Medical bills
  • Lost wages
  • Diminished or loss of earning capacity
  • Physical pain and suffering
  • Emotional pain and suffering and other emotional effects
  • Disfigurement
  • Permanent scarring
  • Loss of companionship
  • Property damage
  • Loss of enjoyment of life

These and other losses may be compensable depending on the circumstances of your truck accident case. Consider contacting an experienced attorney to investigate your particular case and determine what damages you can recover in your situation.

How to Prove Negligence in a Truck Accident Case?

Another party is negligent if they fail to exercise reasonable care when operating a motor vehicle and someone sustains injuries as a result of that negligence. However, proving negligence can be tricky, especially if you do not have enough evidence to prove that the other party failed to use reasonable care.

What Evidence Do You Need to Prove Negligence?

You need to gather all available evidence to prove that the other party was negligent.

Evidence that can help you prove the other party’s negligence after a truck accident includes:

  • A police report
  • The trucker’s logbook
  • The driver’s cell phone records
  • The driver’s driving records
  • Witness statements
  • Photos from the scene of the accident
  • Video footage showing the moment of the crash
  • Testimony of expert witnesses

If you suspect that a truck blind spot accident occurred because of a trucker’s negligence, consider speaking with a lawyer to help you investigate what caused the crash and collect evidence proving the truck driver’s fault.

Why Do You Need a Skilled Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

If you suffered injuries in a truck accident, consider speaking with a knowledgeable lawyer to help you establish fault, determine the value of your case, gather evidence, negotiate with insurance companies, and fight for maximum compensation in your case. Proving that a truck driver failed to adequately monitor their blind spots can be tricky, which is why having a skilled Phoenix truck accident attorney on your side can be beneficial for the outcome of your case.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

Phoenix Tractor-Trailer Accidents

Tractor-trailer accidents are some of the scariest and most traumatic events any person can ever experience. Large trucks can weigh up to 80,000 pounds with a full load, which is why collisions with smaller vehicles can be so devastating. Statistically speaking, occupants of passenger vehicles account for the vast majority of all deaths in truck accidents. According to the National Safety Council, deaths in truck accidents represent over 10 percent of all traffic fatalities in the country.

Depending on the severity and nature of the truck accident injury, the medical treatment can last for years or the rest of the injured party’s life. In some cases, the victim may never make a full recovery.

You can recover damages if the accident happened due to someone else’s negligence or wrongful conduct. If you suffered a serious injury in a tractor-trailer accident, consider speaking with a skilled Phoenix truck accident lawyer to discover your compensation options.

Causes of Tractor-Trailer Accidents

A tractor-trailer is a transport vehicle consisting of a semi-truck and a trailer attached to it. Accidents involving tractor-trailers occur for various reasons ranging from driver error to mechanical failures.

However, the vast majority of truck accidents occur due to a driver’s negligence. According to a causation study by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), driver error is responsible for approximately 94 percent of all crashes involving tractor-trailers and other large trucks.

Some of the most common causes of tractor-trailer crashes include:

  • Fatigued driving
  • Falling asleep behind the wheel
  • Texting while driving and other forms of distracted driving
  • Driving while intoxicated
  • Driving while impaired by drugs
  • Driving too fast for conditions
  • Driving recklessly
  • Making illegal lane changes
  • Tailgating
  • Aggressive driving

The operator of a tractor-trailer is not the only party that can be responsible for causing the crash. The driver’s employer—the trucking company—can also be liable if they fail to provide proper training to drivers, do not check drivers’ qualifications before hiring, fail to maintain trucks according to industry standards, or violate other trucking safety regulations.

Injuries in Tractor-Trailer Accidents

As mentioned earlier, tractor-trailer accidents can cause catastrophic and disabling injuries to passenger vehicle occupants. The bigger and heavier the motor vehicle, the more significant the energy and momentum it has. That is why smaller vehicles absorb greater impact when colliding with a large truck.

While some victims of tractor-trailer crashes can walk away from the scene of the accident with a few bruises and scrapes, most people who get into accidents with large trucks suffer disabling and life-threatening injuries.

Common injuries sustained by tractor-trailer accident victims include:

  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Back and neck injuries
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Broken bones or bone fractures
  • Paralysis
  • Severe burn injuries
  • Hip and torso injuries
  • Concussion
  • Lacerations
  • Internal bleeding
  • Wrongful death

Symptoms of an injury may not be immediately apparent following a tractor-trailer accident, which is why it is critical to seek medical attention as soon as possible. A doctor will help you understand the extent and severity of your injuries.

Why Tractor-Trailer Cases Are More Complicated Than Car Accident Cases

Accidents involving tractor-trailers can be much more complicated than crashes between two passenger vehicles.

Cases involving large trucks can be more complicated due to:

  1. Victims can suffer catastrophic injuries. Victims of tractor-trailer accidents—particularly occupants of passenger vehicles—can suffer more severe and devastating injuries due to the size and weight of large trucks. Estimating the victim’s damages becomes more complicated when injuries are disabling or severe.
  2. Multiple liable parties. Typically, a victim of a tractor-trailer accident can recover damages from several parties, including the truck driver, their employer, the company responsible for loading cargo in the trailer, the manufacturer of the truck and its parts, and others. Since truck accident cases can involve so many parties, determining liability becomes more challenging.
  3. Special laws and regulations. Truck drivers and trucking companies must abide by countless special safety regulations. Failure to comply with the trucking regulations can be strong evidence of negligence on the part of the trucker or their employer. However, because there are hundreds of rules and regulations in the trucking company, a victim might need the legal counsel of an attorney to determine liability.

Discuss your case with an experienced lawyer familiar with the trucking regulations to determine fault in your case and help you pursue the maximum possible compensation for your injuries.

How Do You Identify Negligence in Tractor-Trailer Accidents?

According to the National Safety Council, large trucks are involved in over 5,000 fatal accidents each year, of which about 6.4 percent occur in Arizona. The vast majority of such crashes occur due to negligence on the part of drivers.

However, proving negligence after a tractor-trailer accident can be a daunting task because there is usually more than one liable party. An injured party may need to hire a lawyer to investigate their accident and collect evidence to support their case.

While truck drivers must exercise reasonable care when operating the truck, trucking companies must be selective in hiring drivers and must follow both state and federal regulations to minimize the occurrence of preventable collisions involving their vehicles.

What Evidence Do You Need to Prove Fault in a Tractor-Trailer Accident?

Since there may be multiple liable parties in a truck accident case, it is essential to start gathering evidence as soon as possible. If you do not collect and preserve evidence quickly, some pieces of evidence can go missing, or parties might tamper with it.

Evidence that can be necessary to prove fault in a tractor-trailer accident include:

  • Witness testimony
  • The police report
  • Pictures from the scene of the accident
  • Surveillance video footage or traffic camera footage showing the moment of the collision
  • Expert testimony
  • The driver’s logbook
  • The truck’s black box data
  • The trucking company’s maintenance records
  • The victim’s medical records

Your lawyer can use these and other types of evidence to determine liability and prove the extent of your injuries. Consider contacting a seasoned and results-driven attorney to conduct a comprehensive investigation and collect all available evidence proving the other party’s fault.

Compensation for Injuries After a Tractor-Trailer Accident

When you get injured in a tractor-trailer accident, it is vital to understand what compensation will pay for all of your losses. Consider speaking with an experienced lawyer to fight for fair compensation after your truck accident.

Usually, victims of tractor-trailer accidents can recover:

  • Medical bills. Liable parties can be responsible for the victim’s medical expenses incurred because of the accident. Compensation for medical bills includes both past and future expenses.
  • Lost wages. A victim may not be able to work for a certain time while recovering after a tractor-trailer accident. In some cases, the injured victim may lose their earning capacity forever. A skilled attorney can help you pursue compensation for the loss of income and the diminished earning capacity.
  • Emotional (non-economic) damages. In many cases, non-economic damages such as pain and suffering can account for the largest portion of the settlement. Victims can seek compensation for their emotional distress, physical pain, mental anguish and suffering, the loss of enjoyment of life, and other non-economic effects.
  • Punitive damages. Depending on state law and the other party’s conduct, punitive damages may be available to punish the other party for engaging in especially egregious conduct.

If you wish to get compensated for your damages and losses, it is critical to start working on your claim as soon as possible. You might benefit from seeking the legal counsel of an experienced lawyer to investigate your tractor-trailer accident, collect evidence to prove the other party’s negligence, obtain witness testimony, and help you obtain the compensation you deserve while you focus on your recovery.

Benefits of Hiring a Tractor-Trailer Accident Lawyer

A knowledgeable attorney on your side can help get you the compensation you need to put your life back on track and ease your financial and emotional burdens.

A tractor-trailer accident lawyer will work on your case to:

  • Collect evidence to prove negligence on the part of the truck driver, the trucking company, or other parties
  • Identify all potentially liable parties
  • Communicate with insurance companies and protect your rights during negotiations
  • Accurately estimate the value of your truck accident claim to determine proper compensation for your damages
  • Retain expert witnesses to determine what caused the accident
  • Hire medical experts to determine how your injury will affect your life
  • If the insurance company fails to settle your claim for an adequate amount, take your case to court and represent your best interests in the courtroom

Almost all personal injury cases, including those stemming from truck accidents, settle pre-trial. However, in some cases, filing a lawsuit may be necessary to get the highest compensation possible.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Tractor-Trailer Accidents

Do All Tractor-Trailer Accidents Go to Trial?

While most truck accident cases settle out of court, some of these cases go to trial. A tractor-trailer accident case may go to trial if the victim’s injuries are too severe, the victim dies after the accident, or the parties cannot reach a mutually acceptable out-of-court settlement.

Taking your case to trial can be a costly and lengthy process that does not guarantee a favorable outcome, which is why you might want to consider speaking with a lawyer before filing a lawsuit to discuss your options.

How Long Will It Take to Obtain Compensation After a Truck Accident?

Seeking compensation after a truck accident can be a complex and time-consuming process. It is not possible to predict how long it will take a victim of a truck crash to settle their case and receive the compensation to which they are entitled. While some cases take a few months to resolve, others may go on for years and require litigation.

How Long Do You Have to File a Lawsuit After a Tractor-Trailer Accident?

The time limit for filing a lawsuit stemming from a truck accident is known as the statute of limitations. Each state has a different time limit for personal injury and wrongful death cases, which is why you might want to speak with a lawyer in your state to learn more about the applicable statute of limitations.

What Is the Average Truck Accident Settlement?

There is no such thing as the “average” settlement. Each case is unique, which is why the value of your claim heavily depends on the circumstances of your accident, the severity of your injuries, and other factors.

When reviewing your case, a skilled lawyer can evaluate your damages and losses and determine a reasonable settlement payment for your tractor-trailer accident.

Your lawyer will examine the following factors when determining how much money you can expect:

  • The fault for the accident
  • The severity and nature of your injuries
  • The cost of your medical treatment
  • Whether or not you will get back on your feet or make a full recovery
  • Your lost wages
  • The vehicle repair costs
  • The effect of the accident on your emotional and psychological wellbeing

These and many other factors will affect the value of your insurance claim following a tractor-trailer accident. Consider speaking with a knowledgeable lawyer to determine a fair settlement amount in your case.

Do You Need an Attorney After a Tractor-Trailer Accident?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

Yes—especially if you sustain a severe injury that affects your ability to work or will affect you in any other way for a long time.

A Phoenix truck accident attorney will advocate for your rights and ensure that you receive fair compensation for your losses. You may also need a lawyer to help you handle the claims process and negotiate with insurance companies to fight for the compensation you deserve. When looking for a lawyer, you need someone who has extensive experience handling tractor-trailer accident cases in Arizona.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

When Phoenix Tow Trucks Collide With You

Whenever a car breaks down or experiences a flat tire, the driver will call a tow truck to have their vehicle towed. Tow truck design enables them to transport other vehicles from one location to another. For example, drivers use tow trucks to haul disabled vehicles from the scene of an accident to an auto repair shop.

However, it is not uncommon for tow trucks to be involved in motor vehicle accidents themselves. When accidents involving tow trucks occur, victims of the crash are likely to suffer devastating injuries due to the sheer size and design of the tow truck. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), truck accidents result in over 4,000 deaths each year. These accidents also include crashes involving tow trucks.

If you sustained injuries in a tow truck accident, you might be entitled to financial compensation. Consider speaking with an experienced Phoenix truck accident attorney to understand your legal options and determine what compensation is available in your particular case.

Types of Tow Trucks

When driving around Phoenix, Arizona, or any other city in our country, you might notice that there are different types of tow trucks:

  1. Hook-and-chain tow truck – This truck comes with chains and a hook to tow vehicles or other objects.
  2. Wheel-lift tow truck – This type of tow truck is equipped with a hydraulic boom with two crossbars at the end. These bars slip under the front or rear wheels of a towed vehicle.
  3. Heavy duty (integrated) tow truck – These tow trucks can tow large vehicles such as buses and rigs. Integrated tow trucks have an extra axle for added stability and strength.
  4. Flatbed tow truck – These tow trucks are the most commonly used trucks to tow vehicles in our country. The truck has a hydraulic flatbed that reaches ground level and can slide a damaged car onto the bed.
  5. Rollback tow truck – This tow truck has a similar design as a flatbed truck in which the entire body inclines and lowers the rear end onto the ground to pull a disabled vehicle up onto the flatbed.

Tow trucks are massive and heavy vehicles that can be difficult to maneuver, even for experienced drivers who have operated tow trucks for years. Tow trucks have large blind spots that make it difficult for a trucker to see what happens underneath the truck and on its sides. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), drivers of tow trucks have one of the highest accident and death rates compared to workers in other industries.

When towing a damaged or disabled vehicle, the tow truck can cross the center divider line when making a wide turn. Many drivers of passenger cars are not aware of this and may collide with the truck head-on.

Common Types of Tow Truck Accidents

The vast majority of tow truck accidents in our country are the result of driver negligence.

Driver error can result in any of the following types of accidents involving tow trucks:

  • Rear-end crashes where a tow truck crashes into the back of another vehicle in front of it or vice versa.
  • Head-on collisions where the front of a tow truck collides with the front of another vehicle traveling in the opposite direction.
  • T-bone accidents where the front of a tow truck crashes into the side of another vehicle or vice versa.
  • Sideswipe collisions where a tow truck swipes the side of another vehicle traveling in the same direction or vice versa.
  • Underride accidents where a smaller vehicle slides underneath a large truck.

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, there were only 57 collisions involving tow trucks in Arizona in a recent year. However, any of the above-mentioned types of collisions can cause catastrophic injuries or extensive property damage.

Causes of Tow Truck Accidents

Collisions with tow trucks occur for various reasons, though most crashes involving these vehicles are the result of driver error.

The following are some of the most common causes of tow truck accidents:

  • Driving while intoxicated
  • Fatigued driving
  • Speeding
  • Distracted driving
  • Mechanical failures, including brake problems
  • Problems with the tires
  • Making illegal lane changes
  • Inadequate vehicle maintenance
  • Failing to use proper warning signs
  • Failing to secure the towed vehicle properly
  • Failing to check blind spots
  • Poor road conditions
  • Bad weather

Operators of tow trucks must ensure that the towed car is safely loaded and properly secured to prevent it from slipping off the truck. When a driver does not secure a towed car properly, the tow truck is likely to overturn or roll over.

Liable Parties in Tow Truck Accidents

Tow truck accidents are more complicated than crashes involving other vehicles because there may be multiple liable parties. Identifying liable parties is a complicated process that requires prompt investigation and liability analysis by a knowledgeable attorney.

Potentially liable parties that can be responsible for your tow truck crash include:

  • The driver of the tow truck – If you can prove that the operator of the tow truck acted negligently, they can be liable for any resulting losses and damages. A common example of negligence is speeding and failure to check blind spots when changing lanes or failure to signal a lane change. If the trucker failed to obey any of the traffic laws, they can be liable for the accident.
  • The towing company – Most operators of tow trucks work for a towing company that employs them. Towing companies must inspect their vehicles and ensure that their drivers meet the necessary qualifications and pass training to drive tow trucks. In most cases, the company that employs the driver shares liability with the driver. However, you can usually not sue the towing company if the trucker works as an independent contractor.
  • The manufacturer of the truck – If the accident was the result of a defect or mechanical issue in the truck, the manufacturer of the vehicle can be liable for the crash and any resulting damages.
  • The company responsible for vehicle maintenance – Sometimes, towing companies pay third-party companies to inspect and maintain their vehicles. When the third-party company fails to maintain a truck in good condition and the truck ends up in an accident due to inadequate vehicle maintenance, the company can be liable for the damages.
  • A government agency – If poor road conditions or inadequate road design caused a tow truck accident, the injured victim can pursue a lawsuit against the government agency responsible for maintaining the road where the crash occurred.

If you are not sure who can be liable for your accident with a tow truck, consider contacting a lawyer. A knowledgeable attorney can review your unique situation to identify all potentially liable parties and secure the maximum compensation on your behalf.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Tow Truck Accidents

What Are the Common Injuries in Tow Truck Accidents?

A collision with a tow truck can cause catastrophic and disabling injuries due to the size and weight of the truck. Injuries following a tow truck may require extensive and lifelong medical treatment. In some cases, a victim may never fully recover or may never walk again after the crash.

Common types of injuries that victims suffer in tow truck accidents include:

  • Whiplash
  • Back and neck injuries
  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Severe burns
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Paralysis
  • Bone fractures and broken bones
  • Crush injuries
  • Cuts and lacerations
  • Internal organ damage
  • Loss of a limb or amputation

In addition to physical injuries, victims can suffer from the emotional trauma that can haunt them for the rest of their lives. Common examples of emotional injuries after a truck accident include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, mental anguish, anxiety, and others.

How Can You Prove Negligence in a Tow Truck Accident?

Proving negligence is a critical step when seeking compensation for the injuries that another party caused.

To obtain compensation for your injuries, you need to prove the following four elements:

  1. The other party owed you a duty of care
  2. The other party breached the duty because of their negligent conduct
  3. You suffered injuries and damages as a result of their negligence

A skilled lawyer can help you collect the necessary evidence and documentation to support your claim and prove that the other party or parties acted negligently and failed to exercise due care.

What Compensation Can You Receive After a Tow Truck Accident?

As a victim of a tow truck accident, you deserve compensation for your damages, both economic and non-economic. In some cases, a victim may also be eligible to receive punitive damages if their state law allows an award of punitive damages and the defendant’s conduct meets the standard for recovering these damages.

In most cases, an injured person can seek compensatory damages such as:

  • Medical bills
  • Loss of income
  • Diminished/lost earning capacity
  • Mental anguish
  • Emotional trauma
  • Pain and suffering
  • Loss of enjoyment of life

You need a knowledgeable attorney to determine proper compensation for your damages stemming from a tow truck crash. Your lawyer will fight for maximum compensation in your case to ensure that you can get your life back on track without having to worry about the financial burdens.

Since many operators of tow trucks are working for an employer when they crash, an injured party may recover a larger amount of money from the employer’s insurance coverage.

What Evidence Can You Use in Your Tow Truck Accident Case?

Collecting evidence is crucial when it comes to proving liability in a tow truck accident case.

You may use different pieces of evidence to establish fault in your case, including:

  • The truck driver’s logbook
  • The truck’s black box data
  • Internal records from the trucker’s employer
  • Photos from the accident scene
  • Video footage that captured the moment of the crash
  • Witness statements
  • Testimony from accident reconstruction experts

Contact a skilled attorney to collect the necessary evidence on your behalf to support your claim and help you get the compensation you need to make you whole again after the accident.

How Long Do You Have to File a Lawsuit After a Tow Truck Accident?

You have a specific time limit to bring a lawsuit against the at-fault party. The statute of limitations starts running from the date of the injury. The time limit for personal injury or wrongful death lawsuits depends on your state law. Depending on the state, the statute of limitations usually ranges from one to four years.

How Can a Tow Truck Accident Lawyer Help?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

There are a few things a lawyer can do to help you seek the financial recovery you deserve after your tow truck accident.

Hiring a lawyer can help because your attorney will do all of the following to secure fair compensation on your behalf:

  • Investigate the accident – Your attorney will review the police report and examine all evidence related to your case to gather all available evidence.
  • Prepare and file the necessary paperwork – Handling a claim following a truck accident means preparing tons of paperwork. A lawyer will help you take care of the documentation and handle all legal aspects of your case while you focus on recovering from your injuries.
  • Identify all liable parties – Many truck accident cases involve multiple parties that can be liable for the victim’s injuries and losses.
  • Determine the value of your case – Before demanding any settlement amounts in your case, an attorney will help you determine what amount of money will adequately compensate you for your losses and damages.
  • Negotiate with insurance companies – Negotiating with an insurer can be a daunting task, especially considering that insurance companies are not interested in paying out claims. A lawyer will protect your rights when negotiating with insurers on your behalf to ensure that your claim resolves fairly.
  • File a lawsuit on your behalf – If negotiations with the insurer do not result in a favorable settlement amount, your lawyer will take your case to court to secure maximum compensation.

Consider speaking with a Phoenix truck accident attorney to discuss your particular case and determine whether or not you can benefit from hiring a lawyer after your tow truck accident.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841

 

Phoenix Tanker Truck Accidents: Everything You Need to Know

Due to the potentially hazardous cargo carried by tanker trucks, being involved in an accident with this truck can lead to devastating consequences. A collision with a tanker truck can result in catastrophic injuries and tragic deaths.

Trucking companies use tanker trucks to haul hazardous materials, also known as HAZMAT. When a tanker truck that carries fuel or other highly flammable liquid is involved in an accident, the tanker can cause an explosion or may burst into flames, causing severe injuries to all those involved in the crash as well as bystanders and occupants of surrounding vehicles.

For many victims, it takes a lot of courage and willpower to get back on your feet and enjoy your life after a disastrous collision with a tanker truck. If you or someone you love was in a tanker truck accident, consider contacting an experienced attorney to fight for the compensation you need to reimburse you for your economic losses and emotional effects.

What Are Tanker Trucks?

Tanker trucks are also called tankers, fuel trucks, oil trucks, and gas trucks. These vehicles haul hazardous materials and flammable liquids, including gasoline, ethanol, diesel, and others. Tanker trucks also transport non-flammable materials such as sand, sewage, asphalt, and consumer products, including water, beer, milk, wine, grain, flour, and others.

Since many tanker trucks on our roads transport industrial chemicals, petroleum-based products, and flammable liquids, people involved in accidents with tanker trucks can sustain catastrophic injuries, including severe burns and smoke inhalation injuries.

Dangers of Accidents Involving Tanker Trucks

Depending on the materials transported by a tanker truck, people involved in the crash can face the following dangers associated with the collision:

  • Explosions and fires – When a tanker truck collides with another vehicle or object, the tanker can leak as a result of the impact. As a result, the transported material in the tanker can ignite or explode, and people involved in a tanker truck crash can suffer severe burn injuries and permanent scarring.
  • Release of toxic gases or fumes – When certain chemicals come into contact with human skin, they can cause burns and other adverse reactions. When a person inhales certain chemicals, they can develop breathing problems and other complications. Symptoms of inhalation of toxic gases include vomiting and coughing.
  • Chemical leaks/spills – A tanker truck is likely to overturn and spill its cargo on the road when involved in a collision with another vehicle. As a result of the spill, people at the scene of the crash can suffer injuries from chemical spills onto the road.

A driver of a tanker truck must exercise greater vigilance and use extra caution when the tanker contains hazardous materials or flammable liquids. For this reason, tanker truck drivers must clear their blind spots before making any potentially dangerous movements on the road, such as turning and changing lanes.

In addition to massive blind spots, tanker trucks are also less maneuverable than smaller vehicles and have an increased stopping distance. When operated negligently, a tanker truck can pose a serious danger to other parties in the crash.

A large percentage of tanker truck accidents occur due to “sloshing.” A trucker is more likely to lose control of the truck, and the vehicle is more likely to roll over onto its side when the transported cargo is a liquid. The tanker truck can become unstable when the liquid inside the tanker starts sloshing around during movement. According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), an estimated 63 percent of rollover accidents involving tanker trucks occur due to cargo sloshing.

Injuries in Tanker Truck Accidents

Injuries suffered by victims of tanker truck accidents can be catastrophic and may require costly medical procedures. A victim of an accident with a tanker truck may face a lot of pain and suffering when recovering from their injuries, while some victims will never make a full recovery.

The severe nature of injuries in tanker truck accidents is often because these vehicles transport hazardous materials and can lead to an explosion. Even if the tanker truck does not explode, being involved in a tanker truck accident can cause life-threatening injuries due to the sheer size and weight of the truck.

Common types of injuries suffered by victims of accidents involving tanker trucks include:

  • Severe external burns
  • Chemical burns
  • Smoke inhalation injuries
  • Internal injuries and bleeding
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Paralysis
  • Loss of a limb
  • Radiation exposure
  • Fractured bones
  • Deep lacerations
  • Permanent scarring
  • Disfigurement

Depending on the severity of the injuries, a victim can incur hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in lifelong medical bills and lost wages. Fortunately, you can seek reimbursement for some or all of your losses by filing a lawsuit against the liable parties whose negligence caused or contributed to your injuries.

Special Regulations That Apply to Tanker Trucks

Due to the potentially hazardous cargo carried by tanker trucks, operating a tanker truck requires special qualifications in addition to having a HAZMAT endorsement on the Commercial Driver’s License (CDL), according to the FMCSA.

The special regulations that apply to tanker trucks exist to reduce the risk of crashes, explosions, fires, as well as chemical leaks and spills.

To gain a HAZMAT endorsement, a driver must:

  • Have a clean driving record
  • Pass background checks
  • Pass written exams

When there is a tanker truck accident, the victim’s lawyer will investigate whether or not the driver has the necessary qualification and HAZMAT endorsement on their CDL. If the trucking company allowed a trucker to drive a tanker truck without the necessary qualifications or violated any other special regulations, a lawyer can help the victim hold the trucking company responsible for the accident.

Liable Parties in Tanker Truck Accidents

A common question asked by victims of tanker truck accidents is, “Who can be responsible for my crash?” The answer depends on many factors, as there may be multiple liable parties. Often, truck accident victims can hold several parties accountable for their losses and injuries.

Depending on the facts surrounding your tanker truck accident, you might recover damages from these liable parties:

  • Parties involved in the accident – Depending on the number of parties to the accident, you can pursue a lawsuit against the driver whose negligence caused or contributed to the crash.
  • The truck driver’s employer – If the operator of the tanker truck was an employee of a trucking company, the trucking company can be liable for the accident.
  • A company responsible for vehicle maintenance – Tanker trucks must undergo regular inspection and maintenance to ensure they are in good condition to reduce the risk of devastating collisions caused by mechanical problems.
  • The vehicle manufacturer – If there were any defects with the tanker truck’s engine, brakes, steering, or other components, the manufacturer of the vehicle can be responsible for any accidents caused by the defect.
  • A government agency. If a collision occurred due to inadequate maintenance of the road, you can file a lawsuit against the government agency whose failure to safely and reasonably maintain the road caused your accident.

A comprehensive investigation by an experienced attorney can reveal all potentially liable parties in your particular case. Consider speaking with a lawyer to determine who can be named as “defendants” in your lawsuit.

Compensation for a Tanker Truck Accident

Medical expenses following a tanker truck crash can add up quickly and leave the injured party overwhelmed. Fortunately, you might get the financial burden off your shoulders by seeking compensation from the liable parties.

You might need to speak with an experienced lawyer to carefully document your damages and fight for the maximum compensation you deserve.

Depending on the severity of the injuries, victims of tanker truck crashes can recover damages for:

  • Medical bills, including the cost of medical treatment, rehabilitation, and physical therapy in the future
  • Loss of income
  • Diminished earning capacity
  • Emotional distress
  • Loss of enjoyment of life
  • Loss of consortium
  • Pain and suffering

Since your compensation consists of both economic and non-economic damages, it may not be easy to assign a dollar value to your losses. For this reason, you might want to consider contacting a knowledgeable attorney who can accurately calculate your damages and estimate your losses.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Tanker Truck Accidents

How Common Are Tanker Truck Accidents?

While tanker truck accidents are not as common as collisions involving other large trucks, they are usually extremely devastating and deadly when they do happen. According to the latest available report by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), trucks with cargo tanks led to 377 fatalities and over 3,600 injuries in a single year.

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, tanker trucks were involved in 24 collisions in Arizona in a recent year.

When Are Drivers of Tanker Trucks Negligent?

A tanker truck driver can cause a crash if they failed to exercise due care.

Common examples of negligence on the part of a tanker truck driver include:

  • Driving while fatigued
  • Operating the tanker truck while distracted
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs
  • Exceeding the posted speed limit
  • Making unsafe lane changes such as failing to check blind spots before changing lanes
  • Filing to maintain a safe distance between other vehicles
  • Failing to yield the right of way
  • Making an excessively wide turn
  • Losing control of the vehicle, which can lead to a rollover accident
  • Failing to exercise extra caution when transporting hazardous materials

Speak with a knowledgeable attorney to determine what caused the accident and identify which parties are liable for your injuries and losses.

Can You Sue a Trucking Company for a Tanker Truck Accident?

In many cases, victims of tanker truck accidents can file a lawsuit against the trucking company that operates the truck or hired the trucker involved in the crash. A victim can also sue the owner of the tanker truck.

Trucking companies may be accountable for accidents involving their tanker trucks when they fail to:

  • Provide proper training to their drivers
  • Check the experience and qualifications of their drivers before putting them on the road
  • Systematically inspect vehicles
  • Maintain tanker trucks in good condition
  • Verify that a truck driver complies with the federal hours of service rules
  • Follow cargo loading rules

A skilled lawyer on your side can investigate your tanker truck accident to determine if they can hold the trucking company accountable for the collision because of a failure to adhere to safety regulations.

What Is the Average Settlement After a Tanker Truck Accident?

No two cases are ever alike, which is why the value of your claim depends on a multitude of factors. As a rule of thumb, victims of tanker truck accidents receive sizable settlements because of the serious nature of their injuries.

A lawyer will review your unique case and examine the following factors to determine the full value of your claim:

  • The severity of the injuries
  • The duration of the recovery period
  • The cost of medical treatment and other expenses
  • Out-of-pocket expenses
  • Whether or not you will return to work or fully recover
  • Whether you are temporarily or permanently disabled
  • The availability of insurance coverage
  • The strength of your claim

While there is no magic formula to calculate the value of your case, the above-mentioned factors will affect the amount of compensation you can ask for during the negotiations.

How Can a Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer Help?

David Abels
Dave Abels, Phoenix Truck Accident Lawyer

Having a lawyer on your side can assist you in fighting for fair compensation on your behalf while you focus on making a speedy recovery.

A skilled attorney can help you handle the following aspects of your claim:

  • Investigate your accident
  • Identify all potentially liable parties
  • Collect evidence
  • Negotiate with insurance companies on your behalf
  • Determine a fair settlement amount
  • Prepare your case for trial if you cannot settle out of court

If you suffered injuries in a tanker truck accident, your lawyer should have the necessary resources and expertise to handle cases involving tanker trucks. A Phoenix truck accident attorney will help you get the compensation you need to cover the cost of your medical treatment and compensate you for your other losses.

Phoenix Office
714 E Rose Ln
#200
Phoenix, AZ 85014

Toll Free: (855) 749-5299
Local: (602) 819-5191
Fax: (602) 819-4841